Surprises make us laugh, and surprises are what one would like to deliver.

Surprises make us laugh, and surprises are what one would like to deliver.

To some degree it really is like learning history.

When you initially read history, it is simply a whirl of names and dates. Nothing seems to stick. But the more you learn, the more hooks you have got for new facts to stick onto– which means you accumulate knowledge at what’s colloquially called an exponential rate. Once you remember that Normans conquered England in 1066, it’s going to catch your attention whenever you hear that other Normans conquered southern Italy at in regards to the time that is same. Which will make you wonder about Normandy, and take note when a third book mentions that Normans were not, like the majority of of what is now called France, tribes that flowed in once the Roman empire collapsed, but Vikings (norman = north man) who arrived four centuries later in 911. That makes it easier to keep in mind that Dublin was also established by Vikings in the 840s. Etc, etc squared.

Collecting surprises is a similar process.

The greater amount of anomalies you have seen, the more easily you will notice ones that are new. This means, oddly enough, that as you grow older, life should be a little more and more surprising. I used to think adults had it all figured out when I was a kid. It was had by me backwards. Continuar leyendo